Spinoza

And we consider it to be unnecessary that it should happen through any other thing than the mere essence of God and the understanding of man, for, as the Understanding is that in us which must know God, and as it stands in such immediate union with him that it can neither be, nor be understood without him, it is incontrovertibly evident from this that no thing can ever come into such close touch with the Understanding as God himself can.


It is also impossible to get to know God through something else. Because, in that case, such a thing would have to be better known to us than God himself, which is in open conflict with all that we have hitherto clearly shown, namely, that God is a cause both of our knowledge and of all essence, and that without him all individual things,not only cannot exist, but cannot even be understood.

Because we can never attain to the knowledge of God through any other thing, the nature of which is necessarily finite, even if it were far better known to us; for how is it possible that we should infer an infinite and limitless thing from a finite and limited thing ?

For even if we did observe some effects or work in Nature the cause of which was unknown to us, still it would be impossible for us to conclude from this that there must be in Nature an infinite and limitless thing in order to produce this result. For how can we know whether many causes have concurred in order to produce this, or whether there was only one? Who is to tell us?

So,,, to make an end of all this, it only remains for me still to say to my friends to whom I write this - Be not astonished at these novelties, for it is very well known to you that a thing does not therefore cease to be true because it is not accepted by many.


None are more taken in by flattery than the proud, who wish to be the first, but are not.




Do not weep, do not wax indignant, understand.

Baruch Spinoza


Be not astonished at new ideas, for it is well known to you that a thing does not therefore cease to be true because it is not accepted by many.

Baruch Spinoza


None are more taken in by flattery than the proud, who wish to be the first and are not.